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    Formal antibiotic stewardship programs work in children’s hospitals

    Children’s hospitals with formal antibiotic stewardship programs (ASPs) helped reduce antibiotic use significantly following the 2007 release of guidelines for developing these programs, according to a report published in Pediatrics.

    Adam L. Hersh, MD, PhD, and his colleagues found that antibiotic prescribing improved in hospitals with and without ASPs after the 2007 release of Guidelines for Developing an Institutional Program to Enhance Antimicrobial Stewardship, developed by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).

    Antimicrobial stewardship teams save lives

    The authors compared trends of antibiotic use in children’s hospitals with and without ASPs during two time periods (January 2004 to before January 2007) and (after January 2007 to December 2012). Thirty-one hospitals were included in the study, and nine had ASPs.

    “Changes [in antibiotic use] were more pronounced among those hospitals that established formalized ASPs during this period [2007 to 2012] compared with those that did not,” Hersh and his co-authors wrote.

    Prior to 2007, there was no real difference in average antibiotic use between children’s hospitals with and without ASPs (775 versus 771 days of therapy/1000 patient days). However after 2007, children’s hospitals with ASPs fared much better in reducing antibiotics (11%) compared to those hospitals without the ASPs (8%).

    Julia Talsma, Content Channel Director
    Julia Talsma is lead editor for Drug Topics magazine.

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