• linkedin
  • Increase Font
  • Sharebar

    Statin use associated with poorer diets, weight gain

    Patients who use statins are consuming more calories and fats than a decade earlier, increasing the risk of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online in JAMA Internal Medicine.

    UCLA researchers found that patients taking statins from 2009 to 2010 had poorer diets and greater weight gain than individuals on statins in 1999 to 2000. Non-statin users did not experience the same increase in caloric and fat intake during that time period.

    The researchers speculate that statin users might not feel the urgency to modify their diets or to lose weight because statins were able to lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) dramatically. In addition, patients who agree to statin therapy may not want to restrict their diets, whereas those who don’t want to initiate pharmacotherapy may favor dietary recommendations, the authors noted.

    “All providers should emphasize the importance of healthful diets,” said Martin F. Shapiro of UCLA, one of the study’s authors. “Medicines are not a substitute for eating healthfully.”

    In 1999 to 2000, statin users consumed about 180 kcal per day less than non-statin users. In addition, statin users had a lower fat intake of about 9.5 g per day compared to non-statin users. However, that changed a decade later. Statin users in 2009-2010 had a higher caloric and fat intake than non-users, although it was not significantly higher.

     

    0 Comments

    You must be signed in to leave a comment. Registering is fast and free!

    All comments must follow the ModernMedicine Network community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated. ModernMedicine reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part,in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

    • No comments available