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    A dose of pharmacy truth: Report from the front lines

    An outstanding quality of many of the opinion columns written by Drug Topics readers is their ring of truth. “Who will stand up for pharmacy?,” Kim Ankenbruck’s first blog post (February 10, 2014), triggered an outpouring of e-mails from readers who appeared to identify with every word. Kim has a real gift for expressing what so many readers are thinking and feeling, so we asked her for an update. She sent us a doozy.

     

    My DT Blog post flowed so easily, it almost wrote itself. I wrote it initially as a response to Robert Mabee’s piece “The Political- Medical Complex” (Drug Topics, December 10, 2013). I wanted to let people know that, hey, this guy knows what he is talking about. Read his article.

    My letter to the editor turned into my usual long-winded way of getting my point across, and I was asked if it could be put it in the DT Blog. I was surprised and flattered, but I didn’t see that what I was saying was all that unique.

    In spite of all the kind comments and feedback I received once the article was published, I can’t help but wonder how many pharmacists saw the title and thought, “Sure, YOU stand up. I’m just trying to keep my household running and take care of my family. I don’t have the luxury of making a stand. If I lose this job, my whole life will have to change. OUR whole life will have to change. Not to mention what getting fired or pushed out would do to my self-esteem, my standing in the community. I have never failed at anything — at least, not at anything this big. I pride myself on my accomplishments and my work ethic. I excelled in school, I excelled in my job, I created the American Dream. Now you are telling me that we need to band together and stand up for pharmacy? I’m just trying to survive and keep what I have.”

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    • Anonymous
      If I knew what I know now I would have never taken the career path in pharmacy that I took. I've worked for chains,independents,and hospitals. The chains were the worst,supermarket chains being less so. I've always enjoyed interacting with the customers whether they were nice or nasty,either way the are mostly people with ordinary problems such as I had. The biggest problems were with the store managers,district managers,and technicians. I could never understand why a store manager had keys to the pharmacy with no alarms in the pharmacy. As it stated in the article the district managers I've seen were very narcissistic and some were down right abusive. The technicians I have worked with for the most part were looking to stab you in the back. I had my Hippa rights violated by them and they would gossip about customers loud enough for the to hear it. When reported the management did absolutely nothing. I have however worked with many fine techs but they are in the minority. If I had it to do over again I would have gone into other areas of pharmacy such as drug testing for purity and potency or government work. Unfortunately the article is correct,its all about the CEO's, stockholders and profit. Proper socialization of all aspects of healthcare may be a viable solution someday. The corporate view of pharmacy goes by the first five letters of their alphabet M O N E Y. Let's get away from that!
    • Anonymous
      As sad as it is, I'm glad that many pharmacists have finally shared their stories in public. Kim, I couldn't have said it better. For quite some times, I thought I'm the only one who have witnessed and endured some myself. Since most of what I wanted to share has already been shared by other users, here's my two cents. The reality is that in order to make any change to the profession, all pharmacists need to band together, which is lacking at the moment. Being a Rx manager for 7 years, I too got blindsided and back stabbed by the corp/DM/store managers and the most hurtful by my fellow pharmacists! It is what it is. Well, I'm still here working; what doesn't kill me only makes me stronger. Never once had I ever have a staff pharmacist takes initiative for anything unless I asked. Now we're talking about wanting to make a change to the profession!? First and foremost, more pharmacists need to become leaders--not followers. I still hear pharmacist's comments such as "I'm not a manager so come back when the manager's here; I can careless about the target results...that's what a Rx manager is for." After all, we can't even back each other up at this level but expect employers to back us up? Come on now...yes, I'm speaking to you, followers--how hard is it to take on some responsibilities and help one another out?! Another recent news, CA Kaiser pharmacists will go on strike but wait a minute...not for better work environment but it's rather for their pension and raise!! I couldn't help but to wonder is that all that some/majority of pharmacists care about!? Well, guess what...that $ won't last long...where this profession is going, all of us will get hit...it's just a matter of time...perhaps it's time to take initiative or not. I believe that every pharmacist has the power to make changes whether it'd be small or big, it's a start.
    • Anonymous
      Get real, as long as we are EMPLOYEE pharmacists, no way we can change the current pharmacy picture. This pharmacy profession needs to undergo revolution: only pharmacist and own/open pharmacy. I don't see this scenario is coming. I can only advise talented/smart young men/women think twice before they want to go into pharmacy.
    • Anonymous
      I would like add couple of my view points. 1. Most of the times these DMs we talk about were pharmacists themselves but as soon as they are promoted to that post they metamorphose into the corporate slave traders. Completely forgetting their own days of drudgery. I understand they have to answer to there superiors but they don't have to loose their compassion towards their peers and sense of duty to the profession. 2. All the key board positions of the professional organizations are occupied by either the heads off the chain drug stores or their emissaries. How can we expect anything beneficial to the pharmacist slave force! Just for example we fought for the vaccination program and finally got licensed for it, but who is profiting from it? I know this is a noble profession but still a profession and we need to get paid for the services we provide. Could the corporates not give a little fee to the pharmacists for providing each vaccination? There are many other instances I can talk about were the professional boundary of the pharmacist has been expanded without any increase in compensation. I have so many things to talk about our profession but many be some other time. For now we need to organize ourselves and come up with a plan to save the profession.
    • Anonymous
      This is exactly why I would never work for a "pharmacy" within a larger store. If the pharmacy is not the focal point of the store, you risk the behaviors outlined in the post. Good luck to all the Safeway, King Soopers, Walmart, Target, etc pharmacists. In my experience, if you work for a company with pharmacy in the name where it is known that pharmacists are the drivers of the business, you will not have these types of issues.
    • Anonymous
      Good luck to the Kaiser pharmacists in CA. The profession was ruined by corporate greed. I remember when there was no WALGREENS or RITE AID in CA. CVS was a mini chain here. We had no reciprocity, only 3 pharmacy schools. Now we reciprocate, and have 20 schools. Double the schools in the country, good luck Charlie. CA succumbed to corporate lobbying. Payoffs? This pharmacy chain ruthlessness has been status quo since WWII. As a result the pharmacy landscape has been ruined at 25 years out. I enjoy my peers. Good luck to you all. Too bad your so many and went to rinky dink schools. However, as a group, the APHA, should address the appropriate labor agencies to stop 10, 12, 16 hour shifts without compensation. Why should WE be corporate whipping boys?
    • Anonymous
      Good luck to the Kaiser pharmacists in CA. The profession was ruined by corporate greed. I remember when there was no WALGREENS or RITE AID in CA. CVS was a mini chain here. We had no reciprocity, only 3 pharmacy schools. Now we reciprocate, and have 20 schools. Double the schools in the country, good luck Charlie. CA succumbed to corporate lobbying. Payoffs? This pharmacy chain ruthlessness has been status quo since WWII. As a result the pharmacy landscape has been ruined at 25 years out. I enjoy my peers. Good luck to you all. Too bad your so many and went to rinky dink schools. However, as a group, the APHA, should address the appropriate labor agencies to stop 10, 12, 16 hour shifts without compensation. Why should WE be corporate whipping boys?
    • Anonymous
      Good luck to the Kaiser pharmacists in CA. The profession was ruined by corporate greed. I remember when there was no WALGREENS or RITE AID in CA. CVS was a mini chain here. We had no reciprocity, only 3 pharmacy schools. Now we reciprocate, and have 20 schools. Double the schools in the country, good luck Charlie. CA succumbed to corporate lobbying. Payoffs? This pharmacy chain ruthlessness has been status quo since WWII. As a result the pharmacy landscape has been ruined at 25 years out. I enjoy my peers. Good luck to you all. Too bad your so many and went to rinky dink schools. However, as a group, the APHA, should address the appropriate labor agencies to stop 10, 12, 16 hour shifts without compensation. Why should WE be corporate whipping boys?
    • Anonymous
      Well, well, well. I hope the guys 15 yrs younger than me are enjoying it now. I went to XYZ private school with teaching hospital in my 30s. Not to say they were all jealous and spiteful, but many. TOO BAD. I am 61 now. HA! We had the market cornered in the late eighties. How many can go through organic and calculus? Not many. The CA Unions had a heavy pay hike in 93. Very rosy. And then, we had a board with no reciprocity. Our own exam to keep out the stupid. And fill in the blank exam so you understood ENGLISH. You could walk off the job one day. And walk in a pharmacy the next day and I did! HA! I also worked the night shift and slept! HA! Enter Walgreens and CVS and Rite Aid. Pounding on the doors from corporate greed. The CA opened arms, liberal morons, and the rest is history. But I got 18 yrs of the good old days. HA! No we have NAPLEX any body who could pass a 9th grade algebra class could get licensed in the US. I am not a bigot, but stating we WERE in demand. Now, we are impacted with graduate pharmacists, and DOUBLE the pharmacy schools, with the screwball instructors who couldn't cut it at the pharmacy counter with good customer service.
    • Anonymous
      Well, well, well. I hope the guys 15 yrs younger than me are enjoying it now. I went to XYZ private school with teaching hospital in my 30s. Not to say they were all jealous and spiteful, but many. TOO BAD. I am 61 now. HA! We had the market cornered in the late eighties. How many can go through organic and calculus? Not many. The CA Unions had a heavy pay hike in 93. Very rosy. And then, we had a board with no reciprocity. Our own exam to keep out the stupid. And fill in the blank exam so you understood ENGLISH. You could walk off the job one day. And walk in a pharmacy the next day and I did! HA! I also worked the night shift and slept! HA! Enter Walgreens and CVS and Rite Aid. Pounding on the doors from corporate greed. The CA opened arms, liberal morons, and the rest is history. But I got 18 yrs of the good old days. HA! No we have NAPLEX any body who could pass a 9th grade algebra class could get licensed in the US. I am not a bigot, but stating we WERE in demand. Now, we are impacted with graduate pharmacists, and DOUBLE the pharmacy schools, with the screwball instructors who couldn't cut it at the pharmacy counter with good customer service.
    • Anonymous
      Well, well, well. I hope the guys 15 yrs younger than me are enjoying it now. I went to XYZ private school with teaching hospital in my 30s. Not to say they were all jealous and spiteful, but many. TOO BAD. I am 61 now. HA! We had the market cornered in the late eighties. How many can go through organic and calculus? Not many. The CA Unions had a heavy pay hike in 93. Very rosy. And then, we had a board with no reciprocity. Our own exam to keep out the stupid. And fill in the blank exam so you understood ENGLISH. You could walk off the job one day. And walk in a pharmacy the next day and I did! HA! I also worked the night shift and slept! HA! Enter Walgreens and CVS and Rite Aid. Pounding on the doors from corporate greed. The CA opened arms, liberal morons, and the rest is history. But I got 18 yrs of the good old days. HA! No we have NAPLEX any body who could pass a 9th grade algebra class could get licensed in the US. I am not a bigot, but stating we WERE in demand. Now, we are impacted with graduate pharmacists, and DOUBLE the pharmacy schools, with the screwball instructors who couldn't cut it at the pharmacy counter with good customer service.
    • Anonymous
      Well, well, well. I hope the guys 15 yrs younger than me are enjoying it now. I went to XYZ private school with teaching hospital in my 30s. Not to say they were all jealous and spiteful, but many. TOO BAD. I am 61 now. HA! We had the market cornered in the late eighties. How many can go through organic and calculus? Not many. The CA Unions had a heavy pay hike in 93. Very rosy. And then, we had a board with no reciprocity. Our own exam to keep out the stupid. And fill in the blank exam so you understood ENGLISH. You could walk off the job one day. And walk in a pharmacy the next day and I did! HA! I also worked the night shift and slept! HA! Enter Walgreens and CVS and Rite Aid. Pounding on the doors from corporate greed. The CA opened arms, liberal morons, and the rest is history. But I got 18 yrs of the good old days. HA! No we have NAPLEX any body who could pass a 9th grade algebra class could get licensed in the US. I am not a bigot, but stating we WERE in demand. Now, we are impacted with graduate pharmacists, and DOUBLE the pharmacy schools, with the screwball instructors who couldn't cut it at the pharmacy counter with good customer service.
    • Anonymous
      As I read these comments, I am contemplating the extermination of my 2nd generation 46yr old Independent Pharmacy. Even being self employed is not an escape, as I am no longer a "preferred" pharmacy because I refuse to sign a contract that says I will gladly lose $5-15.00 on every name brand Rx I fill and accept a dispensing fee of $0.50. Every day I read more bad news, never good. from anyone. Yes, there are those who point in new directions, but really, I did not go to school and work 35 years to have to justify my existence in the work force. All of your comments are why unions exist. Unions were created to protect the working man from the greed and cruelty of those who would be aristocrats. As a native of the steel belt, the history of unions and the exploitation of the working man is part of every towns history and remembered by many of our parents and grandparents who tried to teach us about the pride of a job well done. I believe the time has never been more right than now for a strong Pharmacy union. I have never been a "union man", and I support right to work laws, but there is a time and place for everything. Stand UP, people. We can never hope for fair treatment when we stab each other in the back and accept what scraps we're thrown. We went to school for years, we were taught pride and honor. Time to stand together against the forces that would have us be slaves. I'm happy for those of you who found new jobs, or who were comforted by reading these pages, but the problems will not go away unless we act. Hopefully no one has been shot or beaten yet, and I don't think any chains have hired the Pinkertons. Yet. but how many more will suffer ? IT'S TIME !
    • Anonymous
      1. Boards of Pharmacy will tell you they exist to protect the public, yet they allow employers to work pharmacists 10 to 16 hours a day without breaks for water, food or restroom - most likely, poor working conditions and exhaustion contribute more to pharmacist errors than any other factors. 2. The chains call them customers or guests until an error is made due to number 1 (see number 1 above); the customers or guests magically transform into patients - I have NEVER heard of chain backing a pharmacist. 3. The hospital executive over the pharmacy department has no experience running a pharmacy, or even knows what a pharmacist does - Chief Nursing Officers don't know either. In my 15 years of experience as a hospital pharmacy manager and 10 years as a hospital clinical pharmacist, the pharmacy ran best when it was under the Chief of Medicine and treated like a medical department. 4. The district manager of the grocery store pharmacy and the grocery store manager have high school degrees - a 250 script/day pharmacy has 1 quasi-technician (was the checkout person 2 months ago), and the district manager is writing you up for not cooperating with your superior (the grocery store manager with a high school diploma). A week ago the store manager was behind stocking shelves, wanted to pull your quasi-tech out front to help, after all, “you’re just counting by 5s back there, and don’t ever seem to be very busy”, and you told her no. What's worse is your smart mouth, when you told her that when she “makes a mistake the customer complains, when the pharmacist makes a mistake customers become hospitalized patients, or worse corpses”. The DM goes on to tell you that all work carries equal weight CV Ritegreens Drug Stores. Two weeks later you're fired because the store manager (falsely) accuses you of sexual harassment. (Side note - true story - happened to my partner - I was fired because I refused to cover his shifts). 5. Pharmacists are sheep - Some of us are complaining about it, but most of us are doing nothing. I am also in this group but do not want to be anymore. What are our professional organizations doing for the employee pharmacist? We are the majority of pharmacists paying dues, aren't we? Should we insist that our professional organizations begin to aggressively pursue our agenda; or better yet, should we start a professional organization for the employee pharmacist? Should we unionize? How can we get all the new graduates with all the school loans to repay to join in; after all, they haven't lived all our years of professional inaction yet? There are so many questions we need to answer, and, more importantly, take action on. Who is with me?
    • Anonymous
      I worked at a clinic pharmacy for 11 years. After about the fifth or sixth year, I became the pharmacy manager. The previous manager was very "soft" on discipline and was not able to appropriately deal with disciplining the technicians or correcting their problem areas. The first technician was extremely stubborn, and thought she ran the place. At best, she ignored the pharmacists when asked to do something. At worst and most often, she argued with the pharmacists when she disagreed with a decision. When I became the manager, I was now forced to deal with this intense personality. A second technician had very poor performance and after trying to take several corrective actions with her (as laid out in the company policy) she would retaliate by bad mouthing me to other staff, even when I was within earshot. There was also a clerk that always had a perpetual frown on her face. She did not keep an eye on the counter and I would have to call her to answer the counter every time a patient walked up. Again, I tried to deal with her attitude using examples of good customer service as described in the clinic's own customer service courses. She complained to the other technicians and the stubborn one took it upon herself to report me to management. At one point I was sent for "management coaching" with a counselor. My confidence in myself was crushed and I felt like I was in a hole I couldn't' get out of. She had interviewed all of the staff separately and had come to know the intense personalities involved. She gave me pointers and how to deal with each of the individuals, but things didn't get better. The stress and tension in the pharmacy was most likely contributing to poor customer service. After a change in management, my direct supervisor became more involved and facilitated meetings between me and the techs. I think she was finally able to see that I wasn't the cause of the grief, as their stubbornness and unwillingness to change came through loud and clear. Despite this, things didn't really change and I got tired of taking the blame for the lack of teamwork in the pharmacy, so I quit. When I announced that I was leaving, I saw the stubborn technician get a smirk on her face. The next day she announced she was retiring. I'm at a much more relaxed job now, where I work with a great team. I hear often from the nurses and other staff at the clinic, that they and the customers miss me. They have told me that they've reported that through staff surveys. Every time I hear something like this, it makes me smile. I couldn't have been that bad after all! By the way, the technician with poor job performance was eventually let go after causing grief for another manager. It just took several years of dealing with her for the clinic to realize that they needed to cut her loose.
    • Anonymous
      You are talking about 10 hour days. I got out a couple years ago because our State has No laws protecting pharmacists. I was working 13+ hours. Somedays w/o a technician and running drive thru. Try getting a bathroom break or something to eat. Yes it was a chain. Then adding immunizations etc. It got crazy. I don't know where it is going to stop. I did not get my Pharm D to be treated like a fast food chain worker. I think the profession has become less than that. Drive up window ruined the profession. It made people think that they could get their prescription in the same time that they get their McDonald's or Taco Bell.Legislature has to be done to stop the chains and limit the exposure or there are going to be more filling errors.
    • Anonymous
      You are talking about 10 hour days. I got out a couple years ago because our State has No laws protecting pharmacists. I was working 13+ hours. Somedays w/o a technician and running drive thru. Try getting a bathroom break or something to eat. Yes it was a chain. Then adding immunizations etc. It got crazy. I don't know where it is going to stop. I did not get my Pharm D to be treated like a fast food chain worker. I think the profession has become less than that. Drive up window ruined the profession. It made people think that they could get their prescription in the same time that they get their McDonald's or Taco Bell.Legislature has to be done to stop the chains and limit the exposure or there are going to be more filling errors.
    • Anonymous
      As a former independent owner who left the profession for many years to pursue another healthcare field then retire and come back to retail pharmacy, I could not agree more. Not wanting to completely retire I took a pharmacist position at a grocery chain pharmacy. I experienced the same management culture described in the article. Twelve hour days with no help, no meals, no bathroom breaks, and mostly no respect. Do you like having only your first name on your name tag? After a few months, when I came to the conclusion that "life was too short" and resigned there was someone else immediately available to take my place. Regarding the challenge of who will stand up, its my opinion that too few to matter is the answer. When I owned my pharmacy I was an idealist and extreme activist. I was a Fellow of the American College of Apothecaries and a member of Drug Topics Editorial Board. Along with others I dedicated many years to my state association and the National Community Pharmacists Association then NARD. I was a lobbyist for the profession in state and national legislative bodies. I finally gave up. It was bad enough that members of my profession were apathetic and even more disheartening that the legislative representatives felt every issue was only self-serving for the profession. As generally distasteful as I believe it to be, I am beginning to ask myself is unionization the only solution for our professional woes? My experience outside the profession exposed me to the reality that few policymakers care all that much about our contribution to healthcare in America.
    • Anonymous
      Much of what was said was so close to what happened to me I was almost in tears reading and remembering. It IS the chains that are doing these sorts of things. I quit the day before I was scheduled to be fired for failing to be able to complete my quota in the manner they required. I went to the highest ranked pharmacy school in the nation to become a factory piece worker/representative of insurance companies. A tragic waste of my education. I had the highest customer service rating, more awards than anyone in my district.but I was a month from retirement eligibility. Need I say more. I went to part time relief at a grocery store and it was MUCH better. I also did relief at a mental health hospital which was really a blessing. There are possibilities out there,...but the story above is way too common.
    • Mr. KRobbins
      I don't agree with most of this blog. My biggest "complaint" with working for a major grocery chain pharmacy is lack of enough help. Yes, I work ten hours straight with no breaks and a quick lunch (my choice). I have to move as fast as I can those ten hours, and "work my tail off". Some days lately, my brain is burnt to a crisp at the end of the day. But I am well paid, work relatively good hours (9am to 7pm), and am appreciated by my co-workers, manager, and district manager. I do not believe my store manager "despises me". I do not believe the pharmacy is the biggest profit center in my store, especially with lower and lower reimbursements from prescription insurances. My store manager has a college degree of his own, and I know he does not see me as an "arrogant know-it-all". Is he "hungry to demean me"? Ridiculous! Never. My technicians work their butts off for $13 to $17 per hour. They work just as hard as I do for one-fourth the pay. My "head technician" doesn't want to see me fail, she really wants to quit this stressful job, but I keep asking her to stay because I need her very badly. There is no "technician mole" in my pharmacy. If anything, we all band together. "Deceit and cruelty, lying to get rid of me, falsifying drug tests"? No way. I do not experience any of that. My store manager's job is not "easy" from my viewpoint, and he works with us any way he can to make things better for us, within his powers. In Kim's blog, I hear a bit of a cry-baby, and 'poor me'. Some pharmacists I've met are arrogant themselves and feel entitled to make big bucks with easy work just because they got their pharmacy degree. Chain pharmacy is very stressful, but I am well paid and appreciated by coworkers and patients. I feel sorry for you if you work in a different "world" where people are as you say, or maybe you just see them that way because of your own thought patterns and beliefs. I agree we need to do something to make this profession better, and I don't know the answer either, but I also must look at my attitude and my part in this situation. Thank you for this discussion. It IS good to tell your story.
    • RLytle
      I'm with you KRobbins. Currently, my largest gripe equates to about 12%. If the chain I work for would give me a 12% increase in technician hours, then I could do the rest. As it is, we are struggling to get the work before us done on a regular basis - problems stack up and I find it difficult to make good, in a timely manner, on things I've promised patients. This makes us look bad, and damages my ability to build the customer loyalty that the chain is so desparately trying to garner. I have pharmacists that float thru my store that talk to physician offices and patients like they are idiots, others who can't get the concrete off their shoes to move toward the counter to offer assistance, others who simply feel everything is the tech's job except for reviewing orders and doing the final check and generally make life miserable for MY techs. Little of which has to do with my employer. I do have a DM and other store management who pressure me, but they act reasonably. I am concerned about the direction things are headed. I am open to a serious discussion about a union, but that's quite a committment. I'd rather see if we could boost our enrollments with our professional organizations and see what kind of bargaining power that affords us with our employers.
    • Anonymous
      Mr.Robbins, I too once did not agree with these things, but after over 30 yrs as a chain pharmacist, I would echo everything that has been said here as it ALL happened to me. If you have not experienced this yet, you will. The fact that the largest number of comments agree is evidence that yours is a unique situation and the poison just hasn't reached you yet. As she says in her article, "watch your back".
    • josephlutmer
      After being an owner of an independent pharmacy for over 30 years I think the problem it's apparent. It's the "chain" mentality that has dehumanized and stiffled our profession. One would never hear these complaints from independents. How did we as a profession let this happen? We have allowed these soul stealing corporations redefine us as a profession. We have allowed them to stop referring to people as patients and more like customers for their money generating machine (see Rite Aid). They don't care about your working conditions. They don't care that you've been standing for 10 hours with hardly a break to scarf down a lunch only to get back ASAP to the assembly line. They have conditioned you to see people only as $$$ signs. Like the rest of big corporations they are in the pockets of politicians and insurance companies. They are willing to make promises at your expense. I think colleges of pharmacy are sometimes no better. They certainly don't speak up for the working conditions of pharmacists while they're holding their hands out for money. It seens like they are willing to forgo the integrity of our profession for money. I for one would never encourage my children to go into the practice of pharmacy. It has been hijacked by corporations and their desire for money.
    • Anonymous
      I agree wholeheartedly with everything here! Actually I find myself working on various certifications to add more versatility to my resume and like the poster above I have considered going back to school for a masters or a totally different field! We are all dispensable now and at the mercy of abusive, impatient, rude customers! As for the coworkers I find myself in a situation where the shift I work I am completely by myself but I am constantly on my feet doing something! The opposite pharmacist who works when I'm off is lazy and often times is sleeping on his shift! It is frustrating to be doing mine and his work because of his laziness while technicians (yes technicians) are dictating to you what you do on your shift and when you should be done! I'm a hard worker but it is increasingly hard because more work trickles down to my shift! So the customers are difficult and your coworkers are deceitful! It makes for a untrustworthy environment! I won't be surprised if they decrease out pay either, now we are reviewed quarterly and that determines if we get a bonus! How can they review me when no one works with me?? The manager is clueless and I've realized that it is better to be a 'yes' man in this industry and never question anything! My manager is a micromanager who can't relate any of his constant changes to the bigger picture. Weird thing is he was trained at my pharmacy school; I know they trained us to do this! I'm actually appalled by the caliber of people who call themselves pharmacist as many do it for the money!! The true pharmacy concept is crumbling all around as we have become a fast food location! People don't even want to wait 20 minutes for a medication but will be the first to sue should something happen! There are no guarantees in this profession any more. It's a dog eat dog world!
    • Anonymous
      Amen, you hit the nail on the head with this article. I saw the "big picture" a few years back as my hours and benefits were being systematically whittled away, and no other chain store was hiring -- I retrained to become a mental health professional where I have regained full-time status, benefits, better work hours, and JOB SATISFACTION. Interestingly, I am still applying pharmacy knowledge (psychopharmacy) with my new clients in a consultant role as well, and am appreciated for my efforts. I realized that I had to make this career move because pharmacy has changed, and not for the better. We each need to make a choice as to our own next best course of action. Good luck to all...